omes Releases Dreamy Lo-Fi EP To Laze With

omes Releases Dreamy Lo-Fi EP To Laze With

Inspired by cinematic reveries and lazing on waves of lo-fi sound, Bourneumoth-based artist omes recently released his latest EP, boy, a fleeting few minutes of dreaminess. There’s nothing particularly groundbreaking or obtrusive about boy — it’s careful and quiet but built up by a distinct bedroom-pop skillset.

When we asked Omar De Col — the mastermind behind omes — to tell us a little about the new release, he took us back to one of his favorite films, linking its background talent and twists to the humble surprises of his own work:

“I really love the Terence Malick film The Thin Red Line — I like to put it on to fall asleep to in the evening. All the songs I wrote for this EP I wrote the main riff or melody for soon after waking up, slightly stoned-over with those surreal Terence Malick-y passages of footage still in mind. His footage reminds me a lot of the way loops and samples are arranged in music I like. I like to think of the 'drone-y' sounds in the background as images of nature and the riffs/melodies as actors.

I find it really funny that when they were casting The Thin Red Line like 30 big movie stars were all clamouring to be in the film and that a lot of the actors ended up in the background in a few scenes or were cut out all together. I think you can sense that in their performances when you watch the film. I feel like all the parts I'd add to the songs that ended up cut out or deep in the background were like those actors. I read an interview with Adrien Brody where he talked about thinking he was the lead in that film, doing press for the movie with that in mind, then going to the premiere and realising he was only in 10 minutes of the film.

When I write songs a lot of it is throwing a lot of parts down as they strike me and then peeling everything back to find its true centre. I think a lot of the actors in TTRL were offended about being cut out after putting in emotional performances but I feel like what they did contributed to the forming of the movie even if they ended up not being in the film."

boy opens with “wyd,” the record’s shortest track at just a minute and a half. It comes and goes like a breeze, omes’ drowsy vocals sent listing on harsh acoustic strums and plucks. On “wet smoke,” Omar begins to fill the sonic space with layers of new sounds — meek acoustic is given some more weight when accompanied by smacking drum pad beats and quick glitches. The halfway point of boy finds “ok,” a lush duet with Vivi Milne’s barely-there vocals. Again, it’s a downtempo track so nothing crazy is happening, but there’s a really lovely sparkle to it and a wistfulness best accomplished by its breathy harmonies.

On “mend,” we return to another brief instance in which Omar mixes his tender acoustic strums with thick clacking percussion, layers of warring sounds melding together in a strangely satisfying way. boy ends with “mess,” its longest track at four minutes, a clear amalgamation of every element that had come before it on the EP. It hums while it punches, heavy with jarring beats but softened by some of omes’ most vulnerable work yet. In all its quiet glory, boy is the kind of lo-fi effort that physically hurts — it’s subdued, it’s sorrowful, it’s something quite special.

Listen to boy below and connect with omes on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

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Featured photo of omes by Jack Laurilla

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